click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 13
CNBC 8
CNNW 8
CSPAN 6
KQED (PBS) 4
CNN 2
MSNBCW 2
FBC 1
KBCW (CW) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
MSNBC 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
, let's bring in edward kenard, former partner of bain capital and perhaps the most famous private equity firm in history. also the author of "unintended consequences," why everything you've been told about the economy is wrong. and columnist for "harper's" magazine and author of "the age of greed," thank you both for joining me tonight. look ed, i want to quote from an article you wrote just a couple of days ago that was published on bloomberg. first sentence was the u.s. is holding a debate critical to its future, whether it is a tax redistribute and consume income that would otherwise be invested. i disagree with that statement. that premise. please explain why the trade-off is being made. do it quickly because i want him to respond. >> the top 5 pg&e of households save about 40% of their income. and so that's really the income that would be invested so when you tax that -- those households, you're really taxing the households that produce the equity, invest the equity and hold the equity in our economy. that unde
by the tragic news of the death of nurse jacintha saldanha from the king edward vii hospital and we extend our deepest sympathies to her family and all that has been affected by the situation around the world." >> on friday saldahna's body was found not far from king edward the seventh hospital where she worked. the this to say about her. >> "jacintha was a first class nurse who cared diligently for hundreds of patients joined her time with us." >> the radio hosts called the london hospital tuesday and pretended to be queen elizabeth and prince charles in order to gain information on catherine the duchess of cambridge's condition after she was admitted. in the aftermath of the suicide - the radio station's website has been flooded with comments. there has also been anger posted online - including this facebook group calling for the station to be taken off the air. holleran was even asked if the djs should be investigated by police. >> "i'm not going to get into detail on what our procedures are i can tell you we're satisfied that we haven't broken any laws." >> australia's media regulation bod
. the letter to edward conway started on he wants to bring in german immigrants to be in ventured servants, and incur -- intermingle with the slaves. he said their children will be free. i don't interpret that as him kind of being racist saying slaves can become citizens but in ventured servants can. are you suggesting that he was imagining them to intermingling intermarriage and that he -- >> no. no. go ahead. spent the letter pretty clearly refers to the german children that he's talking about -- >> there's a follow-up -- >> i've read -- i know in 1798 short makes almost the same proposal and short explicitly calls for interracial marriage and interracial children. he embraced it spent totally different circumstances. >> it's the same type of proposal. he was talking about german immigrants. the same type of thing, but i mean in jefferson's letter, i mean, i've written about it. i'd be happy to show you the letters. in this letter, he's talking about the children, the germans. >> no. now, he's talking about the children's be dished i have a letter spent that's what he told thomas paine b
that could be a deal-breakner talks to avoid the cliff. representative charlie raquel and donna edwards ahead. >> and medicare is paying as much as back braces like this than they should be paying. before we cut spending and taxes, should we be focus on eliminating waste and abuse? >> instagram, the latest battle royale and backlash is intense so stay with us. [ male announcer ] with wells fargo advisors envision planning process, it's easy to follow the progress you're making toward all your financial goals. a quick glance, and you can see if you're on track. when the conversation turns to knowing where you stand, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. yes, you could. come pre-filled with problems. enough is enough. introducing the chase l
' day, february 8 team. the >> president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's careers in business and politics, which included ventures on wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. >> thank you all. as i tell my history students -- [inaudible] as i tell my histories of it until i went to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air, the fragrance, but where foreigners in a strange way. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writing about the recent past is not easy to tailor this time around. first, there were people got to talk to. i was blessed from beginning to end by having fascinating views. i much prefer working for but documents than listening to people, tried to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know, but they don't know at a
's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message from the prime minister, from yorkshire. [applause] member of the parliament, i'm -- [inaudible] we are -- this is your opportunity to debate -- by more than [inaudible] 260,000 people. -- [inaudible] include -- [inaudible] the children and the people. he has -- [inaudible] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth annual sitting. the sitting have becom
were taken by the photographer, edward steichen, in 1903. he was just starting out as a photographer and morgan was sitting for a portrait--having his portrait painted. and he hated to sit still for very long, so alfred stieglitz, who was a very famous photographer, decided that morgan should have a photo--the painter should have a photograph to work from, and hired edward steichen, who was just starting out in his career, to do it. steichen came in--he actually posed a janitor in the shot while he set it up to get it ready for morgan. morgan blew in, sat down very quickly, took the pose that he always took for the portrait painter, and steichen made the quick exposure and took that shot. however, he didn't really like the pose. he thought it was too formal, too self-conscious, and he asked morgan to rearrange himself a little bit, to move his head slightly to one side and get in a more comfortable position. morgan was not pleased to be told to rearrange himself a little bit, so he bristled a bit. and steichen immediately saw that this was the morgan--he saw these sort of piercing ey
over again. erin, you were heavily involved in covering the john edwards trial. what did we learn there? >> well, i think we learned, number one i mean the justice department has had a real mixed record this year and actually the last four years. in john edwards' case he won the battle. he was acquitted on one charge and there was a mistrial on the other, so he walked away but i think he lost the war. so i think we learned more unfortunately, about this particular individual than most of us really wanted to know. and the whole idea of him trying to come back right now, you know, he spent a fortune, maybe his fortune, on this case. he hasn't worked for four years. he's trying to get his law license back to active status. it will be interesting to see what he does next. >> moving forward. >> changed a lot of people's views about politicians, too, and their personal lives. >> it was an astonishing fall from grace. i think when all of a sudden people start peeling back the layers of your life inside a courtroom, it's not the place where you ever want to have that
known for their skills but also for their shoes. dwayne edwards helped design all their sneakers when he worked as a designer for nike. and now he's giving others a chance to do the exact same thing. cnn's george howell has more. ♪ >> reporter: this is a snapshot of some of the products i've designed over the course of my career. this is the air jordan 21. working at nike, dwayne edwards designed the signature sneaker lines of superstar athletes. carmelo anthony, derek jeter, and his childhood idol, michael jordan. but after 11 years at nike, edwards walked away. >> the industry is close to a $50 billion industry in the u.s. alone. and there is probably a good 3,000 to 4,000 footwear designers in this industry. but people of color are underrepresented. >> reporter: so what you'recome exposure, people knowing about the industry, and also knowing where to go, how to maneuver your way into positions like you had. >> most definitely. if you're asked to do something, you have to do it. >> reporter: that's when this father of two decided to puool his own resources to open a footwear design s
. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's career in business and politics, which included ventures in wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you, all. delighted to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk an
for the victims. listen to this tape. >> hello. good morning, king edward vii. >> hello, there. can i please speak to kate, my granddaughter. >> are they putting us through? >> yes. >> i mean, absolutely unbelievable. so, kate middleton, or the duchess of cambridge, as she is now, is in hospital with this morning sickness, having revealed she's progress. and some dumb aussie deejay rings up with a twang accent. and they think it's the queen of england. i feel personally affronted. alan dershowitz, have you ever heard anything so ludicrous? >> it's the worst imitation i've ever heard. >> ever. there's a corgi in the background. >> i thought it was you. >> deejays are allowed to be ridiculous and funny. of all of the problems in the world this, is not the most serious one. >> carol, quickly. >> they're the ones that were dumb. they put the call through. >> i don't blame the nurse. i don't blame the nurse talking to them. she had been put through by the receptionist, with the immortal words, the queen's on the phone. what are you supposed to say? >> i think it's innocent. it gave us a laugh today. >>
into bankruptcy. joe? >> stick around. i feel like ralph edwards of "this is your life." david do you recollect have something or or just calling in to talk because you saw me on the air? >> caller: the idea that you work your full 12-hour shift is unbelievable. >> well, thanks for calling. the nice and the ice, it rhymes and everything? >> you know, i think having been able to do a little reporting late in the day, to tell you what i'm starting to hear is price terms. others reported you might see a deal. what i can tell you is that the ice exchange is very close to acquiring nyse for a deal worth rafael $33 a share. it would be two-thirds in stock, one third in cash is what i'm hearing. if you back into the math on that, you end up with a ratio somewhere around 1.7 for each ice share and add in 11 bucks in cash, you get to around $33 a share. that's what i'm hearing at this point, joe, for a deal that could be as soon as tomorrow morning from what we're hearing. unclear as whether the board has signed off on it as of yet. the deal value total and $8 billion. that includes debt. the nyse has b
of the year. >>> ted kennedy jr., son of the late edward kennedy is considering a run for john kerry's senate seat, according to his brother former congressman patrick kennedy. "boston globe" reports that ted reached out to family members, friends and prominent democrats including john kerry about the possible run. he will likely faceoff against former senator scott brown who lost his seat to elizabeth warren in the november elections. those are your top stories. "reliable sources" at the top of the hour. now back to fareed zakaria "gps." >>> what would you dine a recession the fatd of a million jobs rested with you and just a few of us. nearly four years ago that was the question facing steve rattner a former fund on the newly formed auto task force. early 2009 the dow jones had recently had its largest single day point drop. 2.6 million jobs had been lost and banks and businesses were frequently failing. few companies were as battered as the big three automakers and in january of that year alone, gm sales were down 49%, ford's down 40% and chrysler sales had fallen 55%. a very tough decisio
performance-enhancing drugs. john edwards walked after federal prosecutors failed to convince a jury the former presidential candidate misused campaign donations to hide his mistress. the last of nasa's fleet of space shuttles arrived at museums around the country. >> and launch. >> reporter: while the first privately built spacecraft delivered supplies to the international space station. >> touchdown confirmed. we're safe on mars. >> reporter: the curiosity rover landed on mars, beaming back pictures of the red planet and felix baumgartner became a human missile as he broke the speed of sound during the fastest and highest freefall ever. randall pinkston, cbs news, new york. >>> looking ahead to next year, mcafee labs expecting hacking on mobile devices now to expand in the coming year. the santa clara-based company is worried about so-called ransomware. that is the type of virus that thalocks up a phone or tablet and threatens to keep it locked up until a ransom is paid. other concerns for mobile customers include trojan horse programs that buy apps without user permission and the
of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at the morgan called winston churchill, the power of words. >> what you're looking at here are two images taken by the famous photographer on the 30th of december 1941. winston churchill had just addressed the canadian parliament and he had made his way to the speakers chamber. he was looking for a drink, perhaps also for a cigar. and what he found instead was a photographer waiting for him. and more than that, because the photographer insisted on removing churchill's cigar. and then photogra
wonderfully well by everyone at the king edward hospital and their thoughts and prayers are with jacintha, her family, friends, and colleagues in this very, very sad time. it's absolutely a joke that when catastrophically wrong, and it ended up with a nurse who took that original phone call committing suicide. while there is sadness on one level for william and kate, i'm sure behind closed doors they are absolutely furious. >> greta: of course, the media has been a problem, a serious problem in the prince's life to begin with. his mother was dogged by the paparazzi. just look at how the media chases down this royal family, and i'm sure that these two radio hosts never in10ed for this to happen, but look what's happened. >> that's right. i'm sure that when they put that original phone call through, in fact, they said as much. they absolutely never imagined in a million years that their phone call would actually get put through. yes, there has been a backlash here. you've got to go on twitter and look at the con sternation really, by people, who are so angry that someone has ultimately died as a
of all three of them. and, of course, marvin kalb, who is the edward r. murrow professor emeritus at the harvard school of government and to contribute news analyst for npr and fox news channel, and is frequently called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading organizations, and also he is very dear to her heart here at afsa. history to serve as moderator and has done a superb job every time. very happy to have you back, marvin. thank you so much. let me just go back and say just a word about the in depth knowledge, the skill, the dedication and perseverance of each of you present today, who worked on the negotiating team for the process that led up to it. really did not just bring this to tuition -- fruition. it required outstanding diplomacy and capacity to balance the risks and demand of piece and the sort of okay security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps most people to remember, but perhaps some do not. so before turning the program over to marvin though, i would just like to mention, we have a new book that is very pertinent to the sub
the other and edward heath premiership, 70 to 74 we had five states of emergency where the government took to itself emergency powers, because the whole fabric seemed to be unwinding. >> rose: today they changed the constitution. >> yeah. >> looking at egypt i still say we were fine compared to egypt, actually. >> rose: here is what you have timothy garden ash quote quoted as saying. in the epigraph. >> if only i had method on this search a single clearly evil person. >> yes. this is from tim garnish, his book, about discovering his own -- yes, what intrigues me about this remark, right at the end of his wonderful book is, that lots of ordinary, not particularly bad, not heroically good people can do terrible things within a bad system so someone like my heroine serena can fall in love with a man that falls in love with her and tell him endless lies because it is too late, it is too late to get out of it, and how systems can make people behave really badly, so that they do all kinds of husband informing on wives inside the old east german system in order to keep their children in their uni
to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was a was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving and it was noisy and kept her awake at night so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. because of all the young girls will come into the camp. i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house about the presidents and these. what hobbies do they have? what were their fears and hopes and what did they -- or were they like his fathers and husbands as another way of stressing presidential characters providing us with another lens. we are all still trying to figure out -- and for example nixon in his free time like to bowl alone and sometimes wore a black suit to do it. that begins to explain things, right everyone? who does this? so i guess all books and up to
. >>> ted kennedy jr., son of the late edward kennedy is considering a run for john kerry's senate seat according to his brother, former congressman patrick kennedy. the "boston globe" reports that ted reached out to family members, friends and prominent democrats including john kerry about the possible run. he would most likely face off against former senator scott brown who lost his seat to elizabeth warren in the november elections. >>> thank you so much for watching today. i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/so it tu for analysis and extras if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes, search state of the union. from all of us we want to wish you a merry christmas. "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign glen hubbard, and president obama's
's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confederacy came close to winning its independence. get set for the key losses that led to its doom. 186200 the death knell of slavery and the military leaders who would eventually win the war. like grant, sherman, sheridan, meredith. the future of the nation was set that year in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and mise
keeps on ticking, no deal yet. what is an investor to do in the new year? >> edward pangin with us, james buckingham, rick santelli. everybody on board to pick apart what has just happened and what may happen going into the new year. what do you think? are you hopeful to get a deal? do you want to buy stocks at this point what do you think? >> thanks for having me on. i think we're getting some closure on the fiscal cliff. but we want to look behind the scenes. earning estimates for the s&p 500 and the broader market. over the last tlie months you see negative pressure on earnings. that's led by energy sector and stocks. ex-financials. and what's also giving us a bit of pause heading into 2013 is the fact that these expectations are calling for about a 7% increase in earnings for next year which may not seem heroic on the surface, but it is a reacceleration from the 5% that we're going to post most likely in 2012. >> you have to think about fundamentals then. >> yeah. i'm worried a bit about that and the fact we're probably going to see a reset in earnings estimates in the next thr
is going marry twilight's edward cohen. actually it's a cardboard cut out of actor robert posing as the vampire. she's doing it as a thesis project and has a commentary on the two sides of las vegas, the real and the fantasy. >>> it was raining bears in hershey, pennsylvania, literally. almost 13,000 of them. an annual fundraiser for are the children's miracle network. fans were encourage tlod the stuffed anim bears on the rink. >>> amazing show of support for a massachusetts woman fighting cancer. a flash mob was organized outside of her hospital room in boston. more than 200 friends and co-workers gathered into the shape of a heart so she could see it from her window. >>> and pope benedict xvi plans to reach people like never before via twitter. that does it for this episode of "jansing and company." don was making a little reaction to the pope tweeting. who thought thomas roberts? >> catholic guilt through social media. >> fiscal no. president obama and republicans in congress are digging in their heels on the fiscal cliff. who will blink first on this game of political chicke
three of them. of course, marvin, who is the edward r murrow professor at harvard kennedy school of government, and contributing news analysts for npr and fox news channel. he's frequently called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading news organizations. and also he's very dear to our heart here because he's frequently served as moderator and done a great job every time. we're happy to have you back thank you so much. let me just go back and say a word about the in-depth knowledge, the skill, the dedication and the perseverance of each of you present today. who worked on the negotiated teams or the process that lead up to it. really did not just bring this treaty to fruition but also reflect the practice of diplomacy at its best. it required, you know, outstanding diplomacy and -- to plan the risk and demands of peace in the opaque security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps most people here remember perhaps some do not. [laughter] so before turning the program over to marvin, though, i would like to mention that we have a new book that is
was initiated with edward reilly and joan walker of allstate, and post the economic crisis, we decided to see what the american public's% since were as to what was happening in their lives and the economy. part of the notion over the years, it is to give voice to middle-class and american public opinion as to what is happening with our economy and their lives. we have conducted literally over 25,000 interviews, the last four years, so there is a repository year of data which is a korea -- which is extraordinary, which is available, and i really recommend it to all of you at as a database that gives a pretty good sense of what the public has been thinking and gives a voice to the middle class. the survey we're talking about the day that edit riley is going to present has a different orientation, more toward what does the public want to see done as opposed to what do they think and how did a few things ir to-do it is ther list, not limited to just worrying about the debt and the fiscal cliff and such. our program today, i am welcoming you. stonewall clerk will welcome you as well. and riley wil
until i'm done. let me run through a few people. maryann hobberman, james carol, edward, victor, lily, jean valentine, robert cairo, and are also winners of the pulitzer prize. juneau diaz, katherine, and tracy smith, amanda foreman. national book critic circle wins nora and robert and dave eagers recipient of the literary award and stephen king. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to our financial supporters. without whom woe couldn't bring you awards the or programs. i would like you to hold your applause until i've read the list. premier sponsors barnes & noble, ban skies, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors. harper colins, stephen king, debra buy lee, thank you. [applause] [applause] okay, now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge in the audience the winner of the fourth annual innovation in reading prize. funded by the lessening gear foundation. listen to the list and hold your applause until i'm finished. we have 15-year-old lily. she started givingly briers in a homeless shelter where kids can take as m
deficit targets. the fund's mission chief, edward gardener, said the country's target of 3% gdp was less pressing than cutting excess from public finances. the imf warned against more tax hikes, warning these could further restrict french economic growth. >>> and speaking exclusively to nbc, the ceo of alcatel-lucent says he expects french companies to continue to battle head winds. >> we will improve on structural inners, for sure. if you take a european approach, you certainly will see some of the benefits of the structural improvement that we made. but if you look two feet on the ground, i think 20 is 13 will not be substantially better than 2012. >> what about your business? >> i think what you saw in 2012 was that the u.s. market was very strong. europe was weak. china was very weak. and i think that if you look to 2013, the u.s. will stay strong. i think europe will stay where it was in 2012 and i think that in china, we'll see. >> how are you dealing with the competition from asian telecom equipmentmaker? >> like every other competitor, you have to deal with it. for us, it's innov
to me. it's men in power, thinking they can get away with it, bill clinton, john edwards, newt gingrich. one after the other. men in power think they live by different rules, that's why he deserves to be top of the chart. >> let's turn to the royal family. even the royal family couldn't escape the list. >> well, absolutely not. and in this case, though, prince harry, the kid's had trouble after trouble. if you invite a bunch of people to your room, get drunk and play strip poker, allow them to take pictures, you're going to be in the press. you're going to be in the tabloid. he's a horrible prince harry in that regard. the duchess unfortunately for her, had some expectations of privacy, she was alone on a french villa. they used long lenses to take pictures of her. that's why he deserves to be in the media, she doesn't. >> is it a double standard, because he's a guy. everyone said, you know what, they kind of brushed it off a little bit. if a woman, a female member of the royal family had taken pictures like prince harry, it would be quite a different story. >> i think it would be, but
is treated for severe nausea at king edward hospital in london. odds makers are rushing to get their wages out. paddie power has 20 to 1 that catherine will be in the babe by's name. 9 to 1 for diana. 16 to 1 for william. we have odds how big the royal bundle will be. five to one under five pounds. 7-2 it weighs in between six pounds and 6.15. no one is betting how much weight she will gain. lori: doesn't matter what the baby looks like or how much weight she gains or loses it, that baby and that family will have a better life than all of us. doesn't matter. melissa: i don't know. dependsswhat your values are. maybe you value privacy. lori: come on! bringing it back to reality. melissa: you're right. coming up tonight on "money" we have chuck woolery of generation for america. he joins us to talk about how the aarp is lobbying for things that affect their bottom line that are not necessarily in the best interests of seniors. lori: dating game? melissa: was that it? i think so. no. i don't know. he is adorable. now he is out there lobbying for seniors to let them know --. lori: our crew is
that? do you know what that is? that's a scissors. i think that edward scissorhands out to be sent a videotape or cd to every republican and democrat and the president so they can learn what cutting is all about. okay? let me get this straight. if we're going to spend one of these and we're going to try to project how many we spend, if we do this and we cut it up, okay, that's a real spending cut. that's what we need to do. we need to take ben franklin and we're talking trillions and there's a lot of bens and we need to cut them. hear how that sounds? here's the problem that i see. we look at issues and then we talk about savings and then we go to a camera and we being all politicians and talk about the ten-year savings. we spend about 80 billion of these, $80 billion, on two wars. for the most part other than how many troops we're going to keep in afghanistan, they're over. so if you are spending $80 billion a year on two wars and they end, you're not spending 80 billion a year so$80 billion a . should you say you're cutting the deficit $800 billion? the real issue is this. if we'
yes, sirs were looked after so wonderfully well at the king edward the xiith hospital here in central london, and their thoughts and prardz are with leagues, friends, and family at this very sad time. there had been some suggestion that the royal family made an official complaint to the hospital about the fact that this call was put through to the ward, but the royal sources tell cnn that that was not the case, and, in fact, the royal family have, in their words, been very support tiff of the nurses involved in this at all times. >> all right. matthew chance, thank you. >>> american software giant john mcafee now running from the law. belize police want to question him about a murder there, right? well, he was hoping for asylum in guatemala, but now he has been denied, so he is in custody, but there's more drama. why he was taken away in a stretcher. cnn is in guatemala with this bizarre twist. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. if you're eligible for medicare, you m
. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but it just took forever. i do share your view and that of ms. norton that we have a really densely populated corridor in the north east that requires her best development of high-speed rail. i don't think that has to be, nor should it be at the exclusion of development of high-speed rail and other quarters of the country. when i think about a trip that i took many years ago with my son from paris to the dirt on your region in france going from a densely populated urban area to a rural and mountainous region and high-speed railways and excluded the mayor. so i think the same can be true of areas around the central coa
company. the company is linked to christian edward nunez, a mexican national who pleaded guilty in 2004 to charges of falsifying airplane maintenance records. starwood management has denied that he was involved with the company. cnn wasn't able to get comment from starwood management or nunez. the learjet in which rivera was traveling was built in 1969. meanwhile, relatives of the mexican-american singer say they still have hope. >> in our eyes we still have faith that my sister will be okay. we have no confirmation of her body being recovered. dead or alive. >> there are makeshift memorials to honor jenni rivera in california where she was born, neighboring arizona and as far away as chicago. >> we did not lose jenni rivera. a legend was born. that's the way some colleagues and i consider it. >> adoring fans have set up memorials in the mexican city of monterrey where rivera performed her last concert before taking the doomed flight. >> our family is going through a very difficult time. we're strong and continue to stay strong, and we thank god for the life he gave my sister for all th
, edward. here's the deal. they are raising or confirming the top end of their guidance for the full year. they are authorizing a $1.5 billion buyback. this is on top of 750 million that they completed this year. they are boosting their dividend for next year by 30% and they are reaffirming their long-term sales growth of 4 to 6%. so the former -- i don't know -- relative of coca-cola, largest bottl bottler in the united states. it goes back to our recovery road trip, atlanta. >> that's right. remember you were in front of those aquatic -- the whales, the dolphins behind you. >> yes those weren't whales or dolphins. >> in the meantime, it's coming on the back of a nice 90-point gain on the dow. thank you. >>> knight capital group's board meeting in hopes of a buyout offer. kate kelly has more at headquarters. kate? >> it is turning more aggressive as they battle for the upper hand. final discussions begin on sunday and getgo will pay $3.60 for as much of the outstanding shares of knight. they would keep knight public. virtue has proposed to pay about $3.20 per share and would privatize th
through the house and the edwards desserts is thaw and serve. >> so many flavors, always there for you in a hurry and takes the stress out of it. >> you want to relax. relax, have fun. >> and quickly, food star? >> food network star cookbook which i'm featured in. >> thank you so much, paul. stay with us. more news coming up on 11 news sunday morning. >> i'm greg toland, amazing turn of events in the army-navy game. we'll show you what happened. >> now, 11 sports. >> for almost the entire second half it looked like army would sink navy and take home the commander-in-chief trophy but mids know a thing or two about staying afloat, escaping with their 11th straight win in this storied rivalry. vice president joe biden on hand for the game. army's trent steelman keeps it on the option and scores. army led 13-10 with less than five minutes to play but here come the mids. keenan reynolds scores, giving navy a 17-13 lead. army on the navy 14-yard line trying for the winning touchdown but the handoff is botched. navy recovers. and the mids come away with a 17-13 win to capture the commander-in
. some people reporting continual in the early stages, obviously. this is of a live view of king edward vii hospital where we believe kate middleton has been for several days, according to the castle, due to early morning sickness. for more details on that, guaranteed it's coming your way. in the meantime, talk for "squawk on the tweet." we have been talking about that study by the carlisle and gallagher consulting group saying 1 in 3 americans would consider a mortgage from walmart and half from paypal. neither offer mortgages. suppose walmart does enter the business? complete this sentence. walmart offering mortgages is like banks offering what? robert writes, it's like banks offering walmart greeter as a financial adviser, free of charge. bubbles writes walmart offering mortgages is like banks opening on thanksgiving night. and kerry writes, ugly christmas sweaters, which might be a gift if you open the new -- a new checking account. dow down 9 points. dell
candidate, at one point, from hillary clinton to barack obama, from john kerry to john edwards, all of them, they all played for their plan with this simple phrase, "rolling back the bush tax cuts." they've been doing it for eight years. so politically, that's why the president has to draw that line in the sand. >> he draws that line in the sand, but harold ford, what happens when republicans, at least a small number of them, go ahead and raise taxes on the top 2% and then turn to the white house and say, okay. now we'll move. and then they have to talk about how they're going to slash spending in medicare, to save medicare, how they'll have to slash spending in medicaid to save medicaid. their political problem on the other side of this tax debate is so much bigger than the republican problem. they're being too clever by half here. >> both sides have complicated hands. and if the democrats, we achieve what the president and some democrats in the senate are asking for in a narrow way around taxes, you're absolutely right. just as an aside on the bush era, this is the first time we didn't go
mention george schultz and edward chef national guard in addition si. neither of them could have done it without that support. -- shevardnadze. by the united states needed the confidence of somebody with the right swing -- wing that would be defensible. most of the democrats probably thought it was a good idea and they supported us every way as we were going toward the soviet union. >> not so much on deployment, jack. remember the nuclear freeze moment? >> i mean when we got the treaties. i would also say in the case of the soviets none of gorbachev's successors would have been capable of doing what he did to kaeu change soviet policy to understand the degree to which the predecessors' policies were not in their interest. to do t took gorbachev what is virtually impossible that is to change the institutions in your country. he ran great risks and ultimately he wasn't successful. but he was successful in most of the things that made a real difference to us. without the two of them i don't know how this was going to happen. >> do you share that view, without the two? >> i do. i happe
you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin kalb, who is the edward r. murrow professor emeritus at harvard kennedy school of government. and a contributing news analyst for npr and fox news channel. antaeus wrigley called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading news organizations. and also he is very dear to our heart here at aspen because he is legally serve as moderator, and done a superb job each time. very happy to have you back, martin. thank you so much. let me just go back and say just a word about the in depth knowledge, skill, dedication and perseverance of each of you present today who worked on the negotiating team for the process that led up to it. really did not just bring this to fruition but also reflect the practice of diplomacy at its best. it required outstanding diplomacy and -- to balance the risks and demands of peace in the sort of opec security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps, perhaps most people to remember but perhaps some do not. so, before turning the program over to marvin though, i would j
edward little high school in auburn, maine, and subsequently attended the university of maine where in 1969 she earned a degree in political science. it was also in college that she met peter snowe. peter shared olympia's passion for politics. they married shortly after graduation, and in 1972, peter was elected to the state legislature while olympia went to work as a legislative staffer for maine congressman bill coen. now, the young couple seemed well on their way to building a life together, but in 1973, in the midst of a winter snowstorm, tragedy struck. peter was killed in a car crash. at a still young age, so limb yeah was left to build a life for herself. what could have marked the end of her political aspirations became a new beginning instead. as olympia once put it, she resolved to make a positive out of a terrible negative. she ran for office in the special election held to fill her late husband's seat and won. it was the start of a long and distinguished career in public service. olympia was subsequently re-elected to the maine house in 1974 and elected to the maine sena
at cuss finch is it, andrew? >> here we go. >> it's not the public defender's office, it's john edwards, and $100 million net worth. >> correct. so big payday for law firm and toyota deal. the big firm, of the winner, hagans berman. do you know them? >> no. >> seattle based law firm that serves as the lead council in the class action set to receive more than $300 million. not bad work if you can get it. >> how much? >> $300 million. taking a third. a little less than a third. >> -- magnetic business cards as the ambulance passes by. >> right. >> i would buy some stock in those today, right? for these guys. you wonder why texas is doing a little built better. because they have put in some rules in place. i'm sorry. >> no. >> you come from a lawyer. >> i do. but we -- my dad doesn't have magnetic business cards. we don't do ambulances. >> no, you were on the good side of things, wasn't he? >> most of the time. >> all right. not all the time? all right. yeah, you did have that sign, i forgot, from the smoker's litigation, where did that -- asbestos? where did that come from? >> the steinwa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)